Work camps to turn lives around

Published

Territory Families has partnered with Jarrdimba Bayamuku (Strengthening the Children) Aboriginal Corporation to deliver intensive work camps for at-risk young people at Seven Emu Station near Borroloola.

As part of this Territory Families is investing $4.54 million across five years to develop the new short and long-term camps that will build on young people’s cultural knowledge and identity, their understanding of consequences, development of personal responsibility, work ethic and experience, and problem solving skills

The camps will focus on practical learning, Vocational Education and Training and work programs such as land management, tourism, construction and management of an organic cattle station.

Youth camps are designed to reduce offending, target at-risk behaviour, increase educational and vocational engagement, improve cultural connectedness and identity, and enhance health and wellbeing. The camps will provide young people with an important opportunity to play an active role in their own learning.

The short-term, 10-day camps will commence in July 2020, accommodating up to eight young people between 10 and 17 years of age. There will be four camps a year until 2025.

The long-term, five-month camps will be delivered twice a year, accommodating up to eight young people between 14-17 years of age. They will have a strong focus on developing vocational and independent living skills to enhance the employability of young people.

A referral panel will assess applications from all around the Territory, with a primary focus on young people from Borroloola, Big Rivers and Top End Regions.

Work camps to turn lives around
The camps will focus on practical learning, Vocational Education and Training and work programs such as land management, tourism, construction and management of an organic cattle station.

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